Effect of cellular senescence on the albumin permeability of blood-derived endothelial cells.

TitleEffect of cellular senescence on the albumin permeability of blood-derived endothelial cells.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsCheung, TM, Ganatra, MP, Peters, EB, and Truskey, GA
JournalAmerican journal of physiology. Heart and circulatory physiology
Volume303
Issue11
Start PageH1374
PaginationH1374 - H1383
Date Published12/2012
Abstract

In this study, we tested the hypotheses that endothelial cells (ECs) derived from human umbilical cord blood (hCB-ECs) exhibit low permeability, which increases as hCB-ECs age and undergo senescence, and that the change in the permeability of hCB-ECs is due to changes in tight junction protein localization and the activity of exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac)1. Albumin permeability across low-passage hCB-EC monolayers on Transwell membranes was 10 times lower than for human aortic ECs (HAECs) (P < 0.01) but similar to in vivo values in arteries. Expression of the tight junction protein occludin and tyrosine phosphorylation of occludin were less in hCB-ECs than in HAECs (P < 0.05). More hCB-ECs than HAECs underwent mitosis (P < 0.01). hCB-ECs that underwent >44 population doublings since isolation had a significantly higher permeability than hCB-ECs that underwent <31 population doublings (P < 0.05). This age-related increase in hCB-EC permeability was associated with an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of occludin (P < 0.01); permeability and occludin phosphorylation were reduced by treatment with 2 μM resveratrol. Tyrosine phosphorylation of occludin and cell age influence the permeability of hCB-ECs, whereas levels of EC proliferation and expression of tight junction proteins did not explain the differences between hCB-EC and HAEC permeability. The elevated permeability in late passage hCB-ECs was reduced by 25-40% by elevation of membrane-associated cAMP and activation of the Epac1 pathway. Given the similarity to in vivo permeability to albumin and the high proliferation potential, hCB-ECs may be a suitable in vitro model to study transport-related pathologies and cell aging.

DOI10.1152/ajpheart.00182.2012
Short TitleAmerican journal of physiology. Heart and circulatory physiology